Christine Brunnock: Ocean Perspectives at the Alverton Gallery

Cornish Art Galleries: Article from the St Ives Times and Echo 22 April 2016

When he first saw the paintings of St Ives-based artist Chrstine Brunnock, Alverton Gallery director Roger Driscoll was so impressed by their haunting atmosphere that he felt obliged to introduce them to a wider audience, writes Frank Ruhrmund.

“Her approach to art is so innovative,” he said. “In addition to using traditional materials, for instance, she paints directly onto aluminium panels which, when hung, gives them a striking three dimensional floating effect.”

Raised in St Ives, Christine Brunnock (pictured) has drawn and painted since she was a young girl. Largely self-taught, she worked as a hairdresser until 2000 when, as she says: “I knew abandoning hairdressing to become a full time artist was a big move, one that would present challenges, but my desire to paint overwhelmed any fears I had.

“Art has always been my favourite means of expression so it seemed a natural progression.

“Deciding to exchange scissors for paint brushes and palette knives was the best decision I have ever made.

“I process thoughts, memories and perceptions of coastal walks or visits to the beach, and then use everything from brushes to palette knives, or whatever else, to make marks.

“I continue to evolve and I like to play and to experiment with ideas, creating drama or serenity, sharing with the viewer my own subconscious awareness of the coastal experience.”

Whatever fears she may have once had, they have long since been forgotten, and her paintings are now to be found in collections the world over.

From such works as Stream and High Wind in this exhibition, many are likely to be soon part of collections closer to home.

Ranging from calm and peaceful to volatile and dramatic compositions that capture and convey a sense of breathtaking moments in space and time, Christine Brunnock’s Ocean Perspectives should not be missed.

An impressive introduction, it can be seen at the Alverton Gallery in Penzance, Tuesday to Saturday, until May 31. Admission free.

 

The St Ives Echo - CB


Christine Swaps the Scissors for Brushes

Art Galleries Cornwall: Article in The Cornishman newspaper 21 April 2016

Christine Swaps the Scissors for Brushes

When he first saw the paintings of St Ives-based artist Christine Brunnock, director of the Alverton Gallery in Penzance, Roger Driscoll was so impressed by their haunting atmosphere that he felt obliged to introduce them to a wider audience, which is just what he is doing with his exhibition.

He said: “Her approach to her art is so innovative, in addition to using traditional materials, for instance, she paints directly onto aluminium panels which, when hung, gives them a striking three dimensional floating effect.”

Raised in St Ives, Christine Brunnock has drawn and painted since she was a young girl. Largely self-taught, she actually worked as a hairdresser until the year 2000 when, as she said: “I knew abandoning hairdressing to become a full time artist was a big move, one that would present challenges, but my desire to paint overwhelmed any fears I had. Art has always been my favourite means of expression so it seemed a natural progression. Deciding to exchange scissors for paint brushes and palette knives was the best decision I have ever made. I process thoughts, memories and perceptions of coastal walks or visits to the beach, and then use everything from brushes to palette knives, and whatever else, to make marks. I continue to evolve and I like to play and to experiment with ideas, creating drama or serenity, sharing with the viewer my own subconscious awareness of the coastal experience.”

Whatever fears she may have once had, have long since been forgotten, and her paintings are now to be found in collections the world over, and from such works as Stream and High Wind in this exhibition, many are likely to be soon part of collections closer to home.

Ranging from calm and peaceful to volatile and dramatic compositions that capture and convey a sense of breathtaking moments in space and time, Christine Brunnock’s Ocean Perspectives should not be missed.

An impressive introduction, admission is free, and this exhibition by this St Ives artist can be seen at the Alverton Gallery until May 31.

Christine Brunnock Cornishman Article


Christine Brunnock “Ocean Perspectives” Exhibition Opens

Christine Brunnock: From Hairdresser to Successful Painter of Land and Sea

Christine’s “Ocean Perspectives” exhibition opens at the Alverton Gallery today and is featured in this article in the Western Morning News, page 2 of the WMN2 section 19 April 2016:

When he first saw the paintings of St Ives-based artist Christine Brunnock, Alverton Gallery director Roger Driscoll was so impressed by their haunting atmosphere that he felt obliged to introduce them to a wider audience, writes Frank Ruhrmund.

“Her approach to art is so innovative,” he said. “In addition to using traditional materials, for instance, she paints directly onto aluminium panels which, when hung, gives them a striking three dimensional floating effect.”

Raised in St Ives, Christine Brunnock (pictured) has drawn and painted since she was a young girl. Largely self-taught, she worked as a hairdresser until 2000 when, as she says: “I knew abandoning hairdressing to become a full time artist was a big move, one that would present challenges, but my desire to paint overwhelmed any fears I had.

“Art has always been my favourite means of expression so it seemed a natural progression.

“Deciding to exchange scissors for paint brushes and palette knives was the best decision I have ever made.

“I process thoughts, memories and perceptions of coastal walks or visits to the beach, and then use everything from brushes to palette knives, or whatever else, to make marks.

“I continue to evolve and I like to play and to experiment with ideas, creating drama or serenity, sharing with the viewer my own subconscious awareness of the coastal experience.”

Whatever fears she may have once had, they have long since been forgotten, and her paintings are now to be found in collections the world over.

From such works as Stream and High Wind in this exhibition, many are likely to be soon part of collections closer to home.

Ranging from calm and peaceful to volatile and dramatic compositions that capture and convey a sense of breathtaking moments in space and time, Christine Brunnock’s Ocean Perspectives should not be missed.

An impressive introduction, it can be seen at the Alverton Gallery in Penzance, Tuesday to Saturday, until May 31. Admission free.

Christine Brunnock Western Morning News Article


APS Photography – The New Vinyl?

This photo of Bodiam Castle was taken by me using a Minolta Vectis camera back in 2003. The photo hasn’t been manipulated in any way, no “smart fixing” or Photoshopping, and I had to wait for the picture to be developed before I had any real idea how it would come out.

The photo was taken on APS film, a now-defunct system given that manufacture of the films ceased in 2011. This is because most people by that time had switched over to digital, pensioning off their film cameras, often leading to a stockpile of undeveloped APS films at the backs of drawers or in the outer reaches of understairs cupboards. APS, or “The Advanced Photo System” was launched on 1 January 1996 at a time when digital photography was not seen as any significant threat. At 24mm APS was two-thirds the size of 35mm and came in sealed cartridges to preserve the negatives and facilitate additional prints. The APS cartridges loaded automatically and would rewind with the same ease once the final frame had been shot.

It’s still possible to buy new 35mm film so why did APS die a death? Was it only ever a gimmick? I don’t think so. To me APS paved the way for the digital revolution, introducing date and time information imprinted onto each frame, an index sheet making it simple to order additional prints, a choice of photo format and even (in the more expensive cameras) the option to unload a partly-shot film so you could vary the ISO. The APS colours are richer and more true to life than 35mm or digital photography and the storage of the negatives means that each APS cartridge represents a time capsule of memories capable of producing prints of such quality that photos from twenty-year-old negatives could easily have been taken yesterday.

An APS camera that might have cost £200 fifteen years ago can now be purchased on eBay for under £10. You may ask what use is an APS camera if the film ceased production in 2011? Well APS film can still be purchased, again from eBay, though of course these films are all now long expired and not all have been carefully stored. But I would say to anyone with an old APS camera gathering dust somewhere, buy one of those expired films from eBay, take your old camera out and experience once more the whirring of the motor as the film loads, and takes each frame, before rewinding after the final shot is taken. Perhaps surprisingly, stores like Boots still offer an APS developing service and it seems that the cost of this has not gone up in fifteen years. So just like the old days you can take your APS film in for developing, wait eagerly to collect the prints then see for yourself some time later how everything  came out unlike the “instant gratification” of the digital revolution. Kind of a trip back in time…

What future for APS photography? Well didn’t they say CDs would kill vinyl? This year vinyl record sales grew and grew as CD sales fell away. Could APS be the new vinyl? I hope so. Rumours continue that Ferrania will be making a fresh run of APS film at some point, but until then I’ll make use of the expired eBay stock which – like my enthusiasm for APS – I imagine will not be running out for several years.

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