Featured Artist June Hicks

This month’s featured artist – June Hicks.
Cornwall artist June Hicks has produced classic landscape etchings for more years than she would care to remember. She learnt her art and craft under the tutelage of renowned printmaker, Edward Bouverie Hoyton when he was principal of the Penzance School of Art. He it was who drummed into her the necessity of fine observation and the importance of careful and precise technique as a way of producing art.
The Alverton Gallery, under its new owner Roger Driscoll, is featuring a number of her exquisite etchings this month. The detailed pictures of her part of Cornwall (she lives in Sennen) demonstrate her refined abilities to capture the atmosphere of the likes of Newlyn and Lamorna with studies of Venice and the interior of a garden shed thrown in.
Her many fans will, no doubt be joined by more during this exhibition which runs until the end of June, Tuesday to Saturday, 9.30 to 5.

More about June from her website:

June Hicks was born in Yorkshire and has lived in Cornwall since 1957. She is married to the farmer, Michael Hicks, whose paintings are also exhibited on this site. She studied art at Penzance School of Art with Bouverie Hoyton and John Tunnard and later learned to etch with Joan Whiteford.

In 1987 she opened her own etching workshop and small gallery at Trevescan, near Sennen. Her work is now in private collections and galleries in Cornwall and beyond. She exhibits regularly with St Ives Society of Artists in the Mariners and Crypt Galleries and is a founder member of Penwith Printmakers, which had its last ever group shows in 2013.

From day one I was fascinated by tJune Etching againhe process of etching,” June writes. “When a drawing is transferred to a metal plate and becomes a print something hard to define happens. it is this elusive mutation which means that the excitement of lifting the blankets and pulling the damp paper off the inked plate never stops. You must respect technique constantly – carelessness can punish with disaster, acid can be fickle, aquatints unpredictable – but surprise bonus effects happen too. Subjects are all around: whatever has light and shade, form and texture invites translation into the hand-printed image.”